Honor Update | Fall 2013, Part 1 | UVA Student Council

In the interest of awareness and reach, Student Council has reprinted in part the Honor Committee’s Fall 2013, Part 1update below:

 
III. Policy Changes
Last spring, the student body made the biggest change to the Honor System in a generation: the Informed Retraction. The IR allows a student who is reported to the Honor Committee to own up to his/her mistake, make amends with the affected parties, and then take a two-semester Leave of Absence after finishing his/her current semester. You can read more about the IR here
 
IV. Overview of Current Honor Cases
25 students have been reported to the Honor Committee since the 2013-2014 Honor Committee’s term began last April. Of these cases:
 
4 have been dropped;
6 have ended with the student submitting an Informed Retraction;
2 have ended with the student Leaving Admitting Guilt;
8 remain under investigation;
5 have led to a formal accusation after a full investigation, and, if they have not already, will proceed to trial if the students do not Leave Admitting Guilt;
and 1 has ended with a not guilty verdict to trial.
 

V. Public Summaries of Conscientious Retractions and Informed Retractions

Four students have had the courage and integrity to come forward and file Conscientious Retractions since the 2013-2014 Honor Committee’s term began last April. To learn more about filing a CR, click here

Note: Public summaries are stripped of all identifying information. All parties are identified using male pronouns, regardless of their gender.

 
CR 1: In April, a student filed a CR for stealing a street sign.
CR 2: In April, a student filed a CR for cheating on a homework assignment by using answers from a previous year’s assignment.
CR 3: In April, a student filed a CR for lying to his professor regarding the submission of an essay to which the student had made edits past the Collab submission deadline.

CR 4: In September, a student filed a CR for cheating on an exam by looking at his notes in the bathroom.

Six students have filed Informed Retractions since the 2013-2014 Honor Committee’s term began last April. To learn more about the IR, click here.

IR 1: A student was reported for lying on an application to a University program by failing to indicate prior criminal convictions on the S.I.S. criminal history update. The student admitted to the Honor Offense and filed an IR.
IR 2: A student was reported for cheating on a take-home exam by having his tutor unknowingly solve the exam questions for him. The student admitted to the Honor Offense and filed an IR.
IR 3: A student was reported for cheating off of another student during an exam. The student admitted to the Honor Offense and filed an IR.
IR 4: A student was reported for cheating on a closed book take-home exam by copying from the class textbook. The student admitted to the Honor Offense and filed an IR.
IR 5 & 6: During a course’s final exam, a student who had taken the course in a previous semester came to the classroom during the exam period and aided a current student on the test. Both students admitted to the Honor Offense and filed IRs.

VI. Public Summaries of “LAGs” and Honor Trials 
Two students have Left Admitting Guilt (“LAGGED”) since the 2013-2014 Honor Committee’s term began last April. 
 

LAG 1: A student was reported for cheating on multiple homework assignments by consulting assignments that had been submitted in previous years. The student decided to LAG.
LAG 2: A student was reported for cheating on an exam by using Internet sources to answer exam questions. The student decided to LAG.

There have been two Honor trials since the 2013-2014 Honor Committee’s term began last April. 
 
Trial 1A student in the College of Arts & Sciences was accused of cheating on two large homework assignments in one course. The case was reported by the course professor. The Community argued that the Accused Student had copied large blocks of text word-for-word from a popular Internet site and should have known that doing so could be considered cheating. The Accused Student, who attended grade school in another country before attending high school in the United States, argued that his educational background emphasized correct answers, rather than originality, thus preventing him from realizing that his copying text word-for-word was wrongful cheating. A panel of randomly-selected students found the Accused Student not guilty on the basis of act and knowledge.

Trial 2: A student in the College of Arts & Sciences was accused of cheating on a midterm exam.  The case was reported by the course’s Teaching Assistant. The Community argued that the Accused Student copied answers from the tests of the students next to and in front of him, providing video evidence from the exam and a statistical analysis of the similarities of test answers among students in the class. The Accused Student argued that he did not look at the tests of any other students and solely interacted with his neighbor to exchange an eraser.  He also argued that the similarities of his answers with those of his neighbors were a result of the fact that he and his friend seated next to him studied together for the exam. A panel of randomly-selected students found the Accused Student not guilty on the basis of act and knowledge.